Jacob K. Javits Federal Building

Jacob K. Javits Federal Building

New York, NY

Architectural Preservation Studio’s professional staff, under WASA, collaborated with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, landscape architects, on the redesign the plaza facing Foley Square at the east side of the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building. Framed to the north by the Court of International Trade, this civic space had leaked into the underground parking garage for decades. APS was responsible for the waterproofing, designed to be installed as a multi-ply system at each of two levels. The slab over the garage, located in some cases 4’-0” below the finished grade of the plaza, received the first system, a hot fluid-applied rubberized system by HydroTech. The topping slab was waterproofed with a 3-ply SBS modified-bitumen system by Siplast. All base flashing details were accomplished with fleece-reinforced liquid-applied membrane.

For the redesign of the plaza, gestural, sweeping landforms fold over the plinth of the Federal Building and link the project to its urban context. A grand, granite stair emerges from the rolling landforms to create an amenity that invites the public into the plan. The material selection and pavement pattern, in concert with a range of landscape spaces, facilitate the transition from the enormity of the Federal Building to the intimate scale of the plan’s internal gardens. The plan spaces are enlivened through the interplay of four seating options: wide marble benches, in both rectangles and circles, reference the scale of the surrounding architecture and provide generous and flexible seating; crescent marble benches follow the edge of planted areas to create intimate spaces; and black granite benches, nestled between the columns of the Federal Building negate the need for temporary barriers.

A close study of the microclimatic conditions and user comfort informed decisions of layout, material and planting. The landforms and trees on the northern portion of the site block winter winds along Worth Street; shade provided by vegetation is a valued amenity during the summer months when the plaza is in full sun for many hours of the day. To compensate for the shade of winter, a targeted Heliostat directs sunlight to six different locations on the plaza over the course of the day. Additionally, reflectors play a role at night when “moonlight” floods the site.

In addition, APS’s professional staff worked on a variety of projects for theGSA at 26 Federal Plaza over a number of years. These include the replacement of the sidewalk along the Foley Square plaza, the design for the replacement of the sidewalk along Broadway, and the design of roof davits to meet OSHA compliance for two-point suspended scaffolding tie backs. We performed the FISP critical examination and report for the Sixth Cycle. We also designed and administered the re-roofing of the adjacent Court of International Trade.

Photo by Alexander Severin Architectural Photography

Jacob K. Javits Federal Building

Jacob K. Javits Federal Building

New York, NY

Architectural Preservation Studio’s professional staff, under WASA, collaborated with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, landscape architects, on the redesign the plaza facing Foley Square at the east side of the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building. Framed to the north by the Court of International Trade, this civic space had leaked into the underground parking garage for decades. APS was responsible for the waterproofing, designed to be installed as a multi-ply system at each of two levels. The slab over the garage, located in some cases 4’-0” below the finished grade of the plaza, received the first system, a hot fluid-applied rubberized system by HydroTech. The topping slab was waterproofed with a 3-ply SBS modified-bitumen system by Siplast. All base flashing details were accomplished with fleece-reinforced liquid-applied membrane.

For the redesign of the plaza, gestural, sweeping landforms fold over the plinth of the Federal Building and link the project to its urban context. A grand, granite stair emerges from the rolling landforms to create an amenity that invites the public into the plan. The material selection and pavement pattern, in concert with a range of landscape spaces, facilitate the transition from the enormity of the Federal Building to the intimate scale of the plan’s internal gardens. The plan spaces are enlivened through the interplay of four seating options: wide marble benches, in both rectangles and circles, reference the scale of the surrounding architecture and provide generous and flexible seating; crescent marble benches follow the edge of planted areas to create intimate spaces; and black granite benches, nestled between the columns of the Federal Building negate the need for temporary barriers.

A close study of the microclimatic conditions and user comfort informed decisions of layout, material and planting. The landforms and trees on the northern portion of the site block winter winds along Worth Street; shade provided by vegetation is a valued amenity during the summer months when the plaza is in full sun for many hours of the day. To compensate for the shade of winter, a targeted Heliostat directs sunlight to six different locations on the plaza over the course of the day. Additionally, reflectors play a role at night when “moonlight” floods the site.

In addition, APS’s professional staff worked on a variety of projects for theGSA at 26 Federal Plaza over a number of years. These include the replacement of the sidewalk along the Foley Square plaza, the design for the replacement of the sidewalk along Broadway, and the design of roof davits to meet OSHA compliance for two-point suspended scaffolding tie backs. We performed the FISP critical examination and report for the Sixth Cycle. We also designed and administered the re-roofing of the adjacent Court of International Trade.

Photo by Alexander Severin Architectural Photography

 

Peter W. Rodino Federal Building

Peter W. Rodino Federal Building

Newark, NJ

Architectural Preservation Studio, under WASA, designed and administered the 25,000-sf plaza restoration project, including the complete replacement of the existing waterproofing system at the plaza, monumental stone stairs and 10,000 sf of perimeter sidewalks. The cast-in-place surfacing material was replicated using pavers which matched the original two-color design pattern, permitting easy access to the waterproofing membrane. All built-in planters were re-waterproofed. The project also involved the upgrading of the perimeter plaza retaining and planter walls with granite to replace deteriorating pre-cast exposed-aggregate concrete. In addition, concrete repairs of beam and column enclosures, damaged from years of ongoing water infiltration, were performed at the existing basement and sub-basement.

In collaboration with Ammann & Whitney, structural engineers, we also designed the slab repair and new parking layout in the garage occupying the basement level. The project entailed full-depth replacement and large-scale patching of the concrete slabs, which were affected by substantial deterioration from deicing salts penetrating the failed waterproofing membrane. In addition to the slab repairs, we coordinated the relocatation mechanical piping and conduits that were hung from the underside of the slabs at the ceiling of the sub-basement. New traffic-bearing waterproofing and coatings were installed along with the new parking layout. We also resolved water infiltration at the sub-basement main switch-gear room, where the slab had undergone severe deterioration due to frequent flooding, by using a fiber-optic camera to investigate the condition of the footing drains and, ultimately, designing a sump-pump system.

Thurgood Marshall US Courthouse

Thurgood Marshall US Courthouse

New York, NY

Designed by Cass Gilbert and constructed in 1932, the Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse at 40 Foley Square is a New York City- and New York State-designated landmark. The professional staff of Architectural Preservation Studio worked with the US General Services Administration (GSA) to resolve ongoing leaks in the occupied space below the monumental entrance stairs. The design-build project was executed with Trio General Contracting Associates.

The first phase of the project consisted of the removal, restoration, waterproofing and reinstallation of the existing granite stairs, as well as the replacement of the supporting structure with a new reinforced concrete structure. The second phase involved the replacement of the existing distinctive sidewalk in kind to provide proper slope for drainage. The sidewalk project was designed as a component of the master plan for the redevelopment of Foley Square. The sidewalk consists of granite and bluestone bands and a special concrete-scoring pattern. In addition to the GSA, this project required approvals from the New York State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), Department of Transportation, Metropolitan Transit Authority and NYC Parks Department.

Alfred E. Smith State Office Building

Alfred E. Smith State Office Building

Albany, NY

Alfred E. Smith State Office Building

Alfred E. Smith State Office Building

Albany, NY

Alfred E. Smith State Office Building

Alfred E. Smith State Office Building

Albany, NY

Manhattan Municipal Building

Manhattan Municipal Building

New York, NY

The Manhattan Municipal Building, designed by McKim, Mead & White, is a stunning example of the “City Beautiful” movement. Since its opening in 1914, it has played a role in the government of the nation’s largest city. The building is forty-stories tall, with a height of 585 feet and a floor area of 926,000 square feet. Its façade is made of granite accented by terra-cotta details, as well as recessed cast-ironpanels at the 21st through 24th floors. Its tower is capped by a 25- foot gilt-copper statue, “Civic Fame,” by Adolph A. Weinman. The building is a NYC- and NYS-designated landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In a series of different contracts, Architectural Preservation Studio restored the façade, the gilt-copper statue, and the historic entrance lobbies.

Leaks in the building over a 75-year period had allowed water to infiltrate behind the granite exterior, resulting in corrosion of the structural steel framing as well as extensive interior damage to finishes. Rust build-up against the tightly packed back-up masonry had transferred to the granite-clad exterior causing continuous vertical cracks several stories high and severe displacement in some cases. When pieces of granite fell from the 25th floor cornice to the ground, the City decided to take action.

The professional staff from Architectural Preservation Studio directed the restoration of the elaborate granite and terra-cotta façade of this landmark. The work began with a study of the cladding for compliance with Local Law 10/80, a NYC façade ordinance. Architectural Preservation Studio documented substantial deterioration by performing a hands-on stone-by-stone review, and subsequently, developed the conservation program to restore the façade. The granite and terra-cotta cornice was also found to be in unsafe condition. Corrosion of the steel outrigger supports had caused cracks and spalls in the ornamental granite modillions and frieze, and some of the terra-cotta anthemions were shattered. Safety netting was placed around the cornice to stabilize the structure and plans were prepared for an extensive restoration of the entire exterior. 39 miles of pipe scaffolding, which made the Guinness Book of Records, shrouded the building for four years.

Similar to the Statue of Liberty, the 25-foot Civic Fame statue was suffering from deterioration by galvanic action between dissimilar metals and settlement of the internal armature. The gilt-copper skin was causing the steel armature to corrode preferentially. The entire statue was dismantled and removed from the top of the building. Limited copper-panel replacement was executed and the gilding restored in an atelier off-site. The steel armature was redesigned and erected in stainless steel. In a dramatic conclusion, the statue was air-lifted by helicopter to its original position at the top of the building.

The originaldecorative scheme of the entrance lobbies included marble floors and walls, ornate bronze elevator enclosures, and faux-marble groin-vaulted plaster ceilings. The marble exhibited years of soiling and wax build-up, the statuary bronze-work was painted gold, and the faux marble was long gone due to periodic leaks from mechanical systems through the ceilings. Bronze light fixtures, known only from period photographs, were also missing. Subsequent to archival research and materials testing,  Architectural Preservation Studio designed the cleaning of the marble, the repatination of the decorative bronze work, and the recreation of the faux-marble finish on the vaults. New bronze light fixtures were cast and installed to the original design.

Manhattan Municipal Building

Manhattan Municipal Building

New York, NY

The Manhattan Municipal Building, designed by McKim, Mead & White, is a stunning example of the “City Beautiful” movement. Since its opening in 1914, it has played a role in the government of the nation’s largest city. The building is forty-stories tall, with a height of 585 feet and a floor area of 926,000 square feet. Its façade is made of granite accented by terra-cotta details, as well as recessed cast-ironpanels at the 21st through 24th floors. Its tower is capped by a 25- foot gilt-copper statue, “Civic Fame,” by Adolph A. Weinman. The building is a NYC- and NYS-designated landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In a series of different contracts, Architectural Preservation Studio restored the façade, the gilt-copper statue, and the historic entrance lobbies.

Leaks in the building over a 75-year period had allowed water to infiltrate behind the granite exterior, resulting in corrosion of the structural steel framing as well as extensive interior damage to finishes. Rust build-up against the tightly packed back-up masonry had transferred to the granite-clad exterior causing continuous vertical cracks several stories high and severe displacement in some cases. When pieces of granite fell from the 25th floor cornice to the ground, the City decided to take action.

The professional staff from Architectural Preservation Studio directed the restoration of the elaborate granite and terra-cotta façade of this landmark. The work began with a study of the cladding for compliance with Local Law 10/80, a NYC façade ordinance. Architectural Preservation Studio documented substantial deterioration by performing a hands-on stone-by-stone review, and subsequently, developed the conservation program to restore the façade. The granite and terra-cotta cornice was also found to be in unsafe condition. Corrosion of the steel outrigger supports had caused cracks and spalls in the ornamental granite modillions and frieze, and some of the terra-cotta anthemions were shattered. Safety netting was placed around the cornice to stabilize the structure and plans were prepared for an extensive restoration of the entire exterior. 39 miles of pipe scaffolding, which made the Guinness Book of Records, shrouded the building for four years.

Similar to the Statue of Liberty, the 25-foot Civic Fame statue was suffering from deterioration by galvanic action between dissimilar metals and settlement of the internal armature. The gilt-copper skin was causing the steel armature to corrode preferentially. The entire statue was dismantled and removed from the top of the building. Limited copper-panel replacement was executed and the gilding restored in an atelier off-site. The steel armature was redesigned and erected in stainless steel. In a dramatic conclusion, the statue was air-lifted by helicopter to its original position at the top of the building.

The originaldecorative scheme of the entrance lobbies included marble floors and walls, ornate bronze elevator enclosures, and faux-marble groin-vaulted plaster ceilings. The marble exhibited years of soiling and wax build-up, the statuary bronze-work was painted gold, and the faux marble was long gone due to periodic leaks from mechanical systems through the ceilings. Bronze light fixtures, known only from period photographs, were also missing. Subsequent to archival research and materials testing,  Architectural Preservation Studio designed the cleaning of the marble, the repatination of the decorative bronze work, and the recreation of the faux-marble finish on the vaults. New bronze light fixtures were cast and installed to the original design.

Manhattan Municipal Building

Manhattan Municipal Building

New York, NY

The Manhattan Municipal Building, designed by McKim, Mead & White, is a stunning example of the “City Beautiful” movement. Since its opening in 1914, it has played a role in the government of the nation’s largest city. The building is forty-stories tall, with a height of 585 feet and a floor area of 926,000 square feet. Its façade is made of granite accented by terra-cotta details, as well as recessed cast-ironpanels at the 21st through 24th floors. Its tower is capped by a 25- foot gilt-copper statue, “Civic Fame,” by Adolph A. Weinman. The building is a NYC- and NYS-designated landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In a series of different contracts, Architectural Preservation Studio restored the façade, the gilt-copper statue, and the historic entrance lobbies.

Leaks in the building over a 75-year period had allowed water to infiltrate behind the granite exterior, resulting in corrosion of the structural steel framing as well as extensive interior damage to finishes. Rust build-up against the tightly packed back-up masonry had transferred to the granite-clad exterior causing continuous vertical cracks several stories high and severe displacement in some cases. When pieces of granite fell from the 25th floor cornice to the ground, the City decided to take action.

The professional staff from Architectural Preservation Studio directed the restoration of the elaborate granite and terra-cotta façade of this landmark. The work began with a study of the cladding for compliance with Local Law 10/80, a NYC façade ordinance. Architectural Preservation Studio documented substantial deterioration by performing a hands-on stone-by-stone review, and subsequently, developed the conservation program to restore the façade. The granite and terra-cotta cornice was also found to be in unsafe condition. Corrosion of the steel outrigger supports had caused cracks and spalls in the ornamental granite modillions and frieze, and some of the terra-cotta anthemions were shattered. Safety netting was placed around the cornice to stabilize the structure and plans were prepared for an extensive restoration of the entire exterior. 39 miles of pipe scaffolding, which made the Guinness Book of Records, shrouded the building for four years.

Similar to the Statue of Liberty, the 25-foot Civic Fame statue was suffering from deterioration by galvanic action between dissimilar metals and settlement of the internal armature. The gilt-copper skin was causing the steel armature to corrode preferentially. The entire statue was dismantled and removed from the top of the building. Limited copper-panel replacement was executed and the gilding restored in an atelier off-site. The steel armature was redesigned and erected in stainless steel. In a dramatic conclusion, the statue was air-lifted by helicopter to its original position at the top of the building.

The originaldecorative scheme of the entrance lobbies included marble floors and walls, ornate bronze elevator enclosures, and faux-marble groin-vaulted plaster ceilings. The marble exhibited years of soiling and wax build-up, the statuary bronze-work was painted gold, and the faux marble was long gone due to periodic leaks from mechanical systems through the ceilings. Bronze light fixtures, known only from period photographs, were also missing. Subsequent to archival research and materials testing,  Architectural Preservation Studio designed the cleaning of the marble, the repatination of the decorative bronze work, and the recreation of the faux-marble finish on the vaults. New bronze light fixtures were cast and installed to the original design.

US Post Office and Courthouse

US Post Office and Courthouse

Brooklyn, NY

New York County Courthouse

New York County Courthouse

New York, NY

New York County Courthouse

New York County Courthouse

New York, NY

New York County Courthouse

New York County Courthouse

New York, NY

Queens Supreme Courthouse

Queens Supreme Courthouse

Jamaica, NY

Queens Supreme Courthouse

Queens Supreme Courthouse

Jamaica, NY

Queens Supreme Courthouse

Queens Supreme Courthouse

Jamaica, NY

Alexander Hamilton US Custom House

Alexander Hamilton US Custom House

New York, NY

City Hall Council Chambers - City of New York

City Hall Council Chambers - City of New York

New York, NY

Norwich City Hall

Norwich City Hall

Norwich, CT

The professional staff of Architectural Preservation Studio, under WASA, prepared a detailed Conditions Assessment /Comprehensive Preservation Master Plan for the restoration of the 1873 French Empire City Hall. The scope includes the preservation of the building’s historic features, space analysis and programming, ADA accessibility, and upgrade of its mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems. The Norwich City Hall is listed on the National and State Register of Historic Places. The assessment was partially funded by a grant from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation. 

Architectural Preservation Studio’s recent work involves preparation of construction documents and construction administration services for the restoration of the original wood flooring and south-vestibule historic finishes.
 

Holland Tunnel Ventilation Building

Holland Tunnel Ventilation Building

New York, NY

The Holland Tunnel, completed in 1927, provides vehicular access between New York and New Jersey through a series of tunnels under the Hudson River. It was the first mechanically-ventilated underwater tunnel in the world and remains the model for similar structures internationally. Designated a National Historic Civil and Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil and Mechanical Engineers in 1984, and a National Historic Landmark in 1993, it is regarded as one of the US’s most renown engineering marvels.

Architectural Preservation Studio was retained by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to assess and report on the condition of three sets of monumental bronze-clad doors at the Holland Tunnel New York Ventilation Building. Per Architectural Preservation Studio ’s analysis and recommendations, the monumental doors were temporarily removed to allow repair and replacement of the concealed steel reinforcement at the doors and frames, as well as repair and refinishing of the historic bronze cladding. Temporary insulated enclosures and exit doors were installed to retain the existing exit egress. The refurbished door assemblies, once reinstalled, will also complied with ADA-accessibility requirements.
 

Federico Degetau FederaL Building & Clemente Ruiz Nazario US Courthouse

Federico Degetau FederaL Building & Clemente Ruiz Nazario US Courthouse

Hato Ray, PR

Chappaqua Railroad Station

Chappaqua Railroad Station

Chappaqua, NY

Architectural Preservation Studio designed and supervised the restoration of the Chappaqua Railroad Station in northern Westchester County. The station was built in 1901–2 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The condition of the station had deteriorated over the course of 100 years. In addition, it had undergone various renovations that had modified or removed some of its original materials and altered its character.

The goal was to restore the station to its original appearance based upon the original Reed & Stem drawings (Architectural Preservation Studio’s predecessor firm), while also upgrading its systems to today’s standards. Work involved all exterior masonry, roofs, gutters, windows, flashing and drainage systems, structural systems, interior finishes and hardware, mechanical and electrical systems, lighting fixtures, ticket-booth systems, ADA compliance and hazardous materials identification and abatement.

The Town of New Castle was so pleased with the results that Architectural Preservation Studio was hired to design streetscape lighting for the historic village.

Chappaqua Railroad Station

Chappaqua Railroad Station

Chappaqua, NY

Architectural Preservation Studio designed and supervised the restoration of the Chappaqua Railroad Station in northern Westchester County. The station was built in 1901–2 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The condition of the station had deteriorated over the course of 100 years. In addition, it had undergone various renovations that had modified or removed some of its original materials and altered its character.

The goal was to restore the station to its original appearance based upon the original Reed & Stem drawings (Architectural Preservation Studio’s predecessor firm), while also upgrading its systems to today’s standards. Work involved all exterior masonry, roofs, gutters, windows, flashing and drainage systems, structural systems, interior finishes and hardware, mechanical and electrical systems, lighting fixtures, ticket-booth systems, ADA compliance and hazardous materials identification and abatement.

The Town of New Castle was so pleased with the results that Architectural Preservation Studio was hired to design streetscape lighting for the historic village.

USPS Building

USPS Building

New London, CT

APS was retained by the City of New London to develop Operational Space Layouts (OSL) for the relocation of City offices/departments to the New London US Postal Service Building located at 27 Masonic Street. This project consisted of a two-phase relocation process. The first phase was to temporarily relocate the current offices/departments located in City Hall during the upcoming restoration project as well as any other additional offices/departments that can also fit in the USPS building at that time. The second phase will be to relocate all of the remaining departments that can fit in the USPS building once the City Hall offices/departments move back into City Hall

New London City Hall

New London City Hall

New London, CT

APS was retained by the City of New London to develop a comprehensive conditions assessment for the preservation and maintenance of the New London City Hall. Built in 1856 and renovated in 1912, the New London City Hall is a significant Beaux Arts-era structure with a stone façade articulated by a Corinthian-columned two-story portico and a decorative projecting cornice and balustrade. The building is on the National Register for Historic Places and still maintains a high level of exterior and interior integrity.

The conditions assessment evaluated moisture infiltration through the exterior; cracks in the stone structure and condition of mortar joints, as well as non-matching repairs; repairs to deteriorated and or damaged interior surfaces and architectural features; HVAC and electrical systems, including the future installation of a split system; ADA accessibility, vertical transportation and toilet rooms. The project also involved the identification of hazardous materials (lead-based paint and asbestos), along with appropriate mitigation, background drawings in AutoCAD format, detailed recommendations and cost estimates. All recommended work and upgrades comply with all federal, state and local building codes. APS developed construction documents for the complete restoration of the exterior and interior of the building, including relocation of the existing elevator. The project is currently being bid.

 New London Firehouse Headquarters

New London Firehouse Headquarters

New London, CT

Architectural Preservation Studio (APS) was retained by the City of New London to perform a comprehensive Conditions Assessment of the New London Firehouse Headquarters Building. The primary focus of this study is to provide the City with a comprehensive assessment of the existing conditions of the exterior/interior, MEP systems and structural condition of the floor settlement issue at the fire engine bays of the firehouse.  Based upon this assessment both recommendations and cost estimates for the necessary repair of this historic structure will be provided.

New Canaan Fire House

New Canaan Fire House

New Canaan, CT

APS was retained by New Canaan’s Department of Public Works to provide design services for the preparation of construction documents for the design of an OSHA compliant fall protection system for the existing hose drying tower at the New Canaan Fire House

Vine Cottagde

Vine Cottagde

New Canaan, CT

Constructed in 1859 Vine Cottage occupies an important and strategic location in New Canaan. It is situated adjacent to the Town Hall, directly across from the Fire Station and on one corner of the Historic District. Although not included in the district, it visually marks the transition from the business zone to the historic residential area of the town.  The Victorian style house is currently used for the Town’s Social Services Office.

APS was retained by New Canaan’s Department of Public Works to provide design services for the restoration of the buildings facades and windows, to provide a new ADA compliant ramp to the main used entrance of the building, to restore the front porch to its original design and to upgrade interior finishes.  Construction documents were developed and bid and the Town is now appropriating the funds to execute the work.

Stillman Building

Stillman Building

Wethersfield, CT

Architectural Preservation Studio (APS) was retained by the Town of Wethersfield to prepare Construction Documents for the replacement of the slate and built-up roofing at the 1880’s historic Stillman Building, originally the Wethersfield Public School. The building is located within the Wethersfield Historic District.