SUNY New Paltz - van den Berg Hall

SUNY New Paltz - van den Berg Hall

New Paltz, NY

Architectural Preservation Studio was retained by SUNY New Paltz to investigate and design repairs to the existing lead-coated copper batten-seam roof at van den Berg Hall. The building was constructed in 1935 and is a three-story masonry building with a clock tower. A fire destroyed the original clock tower in 1990, including part of the existing roof. Our work includes the design and administration of selective roof repairs to keep the building watertight and the design of a new snow-guard system.

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Oswego, NY

Originally completed in 1913 as the new home for the Oswego Normal School, Sheldon Hall is now the flagship building for the SUNY campus at Oswego. The brick façades are of load-bearing construction, accented with limestone, marble and terra-cotta. This three-story building in the collegiate Neo-Classical style represents both the academic and physical history of the college, and is listed on the National and NYS Register of Historic Places.

An extensive investigation was performed before finalizing construction documents. Existing conditions were documented, and the pathology of deterioration identified. Our report described the conditions and provided recommendations for a holistic restoration strategy, including code analysis, identification of energy deficiencies, scheduling, phasing and budget estimates. Our preservation solutions focused on sustainable initiatives, while respecting the special architectural and historical character of the building.

The repair documents included restoration of the copper cupola and copper sheet-metal roofs, replacement of two small failed flat roofs with built-up roofing systems, as well as design of a lightning protection system. The parapet repairs involved complete rebuilding with all new terra-cotta replicas; at the lower string courses, the terra-cotta was selectively repaired. The stone water table was also selectively repaired, and the entire façade underwent spot re-pointing and masonry cleaning. Mock-ups of a new energy-efficient window and restored existing monumental wood window were reviewed by the client in order to determine whether to rehabilitate or replace the windows. The client chose to replace the windows with aluminum retrofits, which matched the existing profiles and functions, and to restore eight original wood windows protected by the portico. Correction of on-site drainage was implemented for the areaway

Photo by Alexander Severin Architectural Photography

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Oswego, NY

Originally completed in 1913 as the new home for the Oswego Normal School, Sheldon Hall is now the flagship building for the SUNY campus at Oswego. The brick façades are of load-bearing construction, accented with limestone, marble and terra-cotta. This three-story building in the collegiate Neo-Classical style represents both the academic and physical history of the college, and is listed on the National and NYS Register of Historic Places.

An extensive investigation was performed before finalizing construction documents. Existing conditions were documented, and the pathology of deterioration identified. Our report described the conditions and provided recommendations for a holistic restoration strategy, including code analysis, identification of energy deficiencies, scheduling, phasing and budget estimates. Our preservation solutions focused on sustainable initiatives, while respecting the special architectural and historical character of the building.

The repair documents included restoration of the copper cupola and copper sheet-metal roofs, replacement of two small failed flat roofs with built-up roofing systems, as well as design of a lightning protection system. The parapet repairs involved complete rebuilding with all new terra-cotta replicas; at the lower string courses, the terra-cotta was selectively repaired. The stone water table was also selectively repaired, and the entire façade underwent spot re-pointing and masonry cleaning. Mock-ups of a new energy-efficient window and restored existing monumental wood window were reviewed by the client in order to determine whether to rehabilitate or replace the windows. The client chose to replace the windows with aluminum retrofits, which matched the existing profiles and functions, and to restore eight original wood windows protected by the portico. Correction of on-site drainage was implemented for the areaway

Photo by Alexander Severin Architectural Photography

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Oswego, NY

Originally completed in 1913 as the new home for the Oswego Normal School, Sheldon Hall is now the flagship building for the SUNY campus at Oswego. The brick façades are of load-bearing construction, accented with limestone, marble and terra-cotta. This three-story building in the collegiate Neo-Classical style represents both the academic and physical history of the college, and is listed on the National and NYS Register of Historic Places.

An extensive investigation was performed before finalizing construction documents. Existing conditions were documented, and the pathology of deterioration identified. Our report described the conditions and provided recommendations for a holistic restoration strategy, including code analysis, identification of energy deficiencies, scheduling, phasing and budget estimates. Our preservation solutions focused on sustainable initiatives, while respecting the special architectural and historical character of the building.

The repair documents included restoration of the copper cupola and copper sheet-metal roofs, replacement of two small failed flat roofs with built-up roofing systems, as well as design of a lightning protection system. The parapet repairs involved complete rebuilding with all new terra-cotta replicas; at the lower string courses, the terra-cotta was selectively repaired. The stone water table was also selectively repaired, and the entire façade underwent spot re-pointing and masonry cleaning. Mock-ups of a new energy-efficient window and restored existing monumental wood window were reviewed by the client in order to determine whether to rehabilitate or replace the windows. The client chose to replace the windows with aluminum retrofits, which matched the existing profiles and functions, and to restore eight original wood windows protected by the portico. Correction of on-site drainage was implemented for the areaway

Photo by Alexander Severin Architectural Photography

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Sheldon Hall - SUNY Oswego

Oswego, NY

Originally completed in 1913 as the new home for the Oswego Normal School, Sheldon Hall is now the flagship building for the SUNY campus at Oswego. The brick façades are of load-bearing construction, accented with limestone, marble and terra-cotta. This three-story building in the collegiate Neo-Classical style represents both the academic and physical history of the college, and is listed on the National and NYS Register of Historic Places.

An extensive investigation was performed before finalizing construction documents. Existing conditions were documented, and the pathology of deterioration identified. Our report described the conditions and provided recommendations for a holistic restoration strategy, including code analysis, identification of energy deficiencies, scheduling, phasing and budget estimates. Our preservation solutions focused on sustainable initiatives, while respecting the special architectural and historical character of the building.

The repair documents included restoration of the copper cupola and copper sheet-metal roofs, replacement of two small failed flat roofs with built-up roofing systems, as well as design of a lightning protection system. The parapet repairs involved complete rebuilding with all new terra-cotta replicas; at the lower string courses, the terra-cotta was selectively repaired. The stone water table was also selectively repaired, and the entire façade underwent spot re-pointing and masonry cleaning. Mock-ups of a new energy-efficient window and restored existing monumental wood window were reviewed by the client in order to determine whether to rehabilitate or replace the windows. The client chose to replace the windows with aluminum retrofits, which matched the existing profiles and functions, and to restore eight original wood windows protected by the portico. Correction of on-site drainage was implemented for the areaway

Photo by Alexander Severin Architectural Photography

 

McVicker Hall - Columbia Unversity

McVicker Hall - Columbia Unversity

New York, NY

McVickar Hall at Columbia University is an eight-story, 50,000 GSF residential building that was built in 1908. In 2005, Columbia decided to convert this residential building into an office building that would provide a state-of-the-art work place for the Alumni Relations and Development Groups, and a warm and inviting Welcome Center for alumni. 

The professional staff from APS were responsible for the façade restoration project. On the interior, a new second elevator was added to the core and the original elevator was refurbished. A communicating stair was added between two of the more executive floors. ADA-compliance was achieved by the sensitive addition of a ramp on the exterior. The missing sheet-metal cornice was replicated from period photos.

Photo by Alexander Severin Architectural Photography

International Affairs Building - Columbia University

International Affairs Building - Columbia University

New York, NY

246 Greene Street - New York University

246 Greene Street - New York University

New York, NY

James B. Duke Mansion - New York University

James B. Duke Mansion - New York University

New York, NY

Keating Hall - Fordham University

Keating Hall - Fordham University

Bronx, NY

Constructed in 1935, Keating Hall is a neo-gothic granite building with carved limestone trim. The central clock tower is a landmark of Fordham University’s Rose Hill Campus. Over the years, the limestone deteriorated, whereas the granite remained in good condition. After an initial conditions assessment, the professional staff of Architectural Preservation Studio, under WASA Studio, designed a probe program to evaluate concealed conditions. Probes revealed the underlying cause of the limestone failures was related to the location of flashing, which led to moisture retention in the limestone.

Subsequently, in collaboration with Severud Associates, structural engineers, we designed and oversaw the repair of the tower. We conducted a stone-by-stone inspection of the façades, and deteriorated limestone trim was repaired by installation of matching dutchmen, and in some cases, full stone units.  At the crenellated parapets, original limestone copings were removed and reset on through-wall copper flashing carefully designed to provide overlaps and end dams, thus precluding moisture penetration into the stone courses below.  The copings were anchored into place using stainless steel fasteners.  Lead weather-caps sealed the transverse joints. 100% repointing with a high-calcium lime-modified cementitious mortar was performed.

The tower’s steel-casement and diamond-patterned lead-came windows were meticulously restored and their performance improved by refurbishing original hardware to full functionality and the addition of compatible weather-stripping. The slab of the upper level roof was so deteriorated it required full replacement. This led to the reconstruction of the copper bulkhead. At both the lower and upper roofs, new flat-seam copper roofs replaced the failed existing. The copper housing for the clock mechanism was recreated, and new copper louvered vents replaced the existing metal-fatigued originals at the four turrets. The wrought-iron staircase was stripped to bare metal, repaired and repainted.

In addition, an earlier project designed and administered the replacement of 900 wood windows in the remaining building with aluminum double-glazed replicas that matched existing sightlines. The unique wood tracery details were retained and conserved.

The Rectory - University of Connecticut

The Rectory - University of Connecticut

Waterbury, CT

Raritan Valley Community College

Raritan Valley Community College

 Branchburg Township, New Jersey

The 48,000-sf plaza forms the core of this central New Jersey community college. The existing plaza, located on three levels and partially over occupied space, had been leaking for many years. The professional staff of Architectural Preservation Studio was engaged to investigate the existing waterproofing conditions and to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation program that could be implemented in phases to accommodate the academic calendar and budget.

The new waterproofing system employed new lightweight concrete over the existing structural concrete deck, followed by a two-ply SBS modified-bitumen system, filter fabric, drainage mat and the reinstallation of the existing concrete pavers. Due to intricate terminations, a fluid-applied waterproofing system was specified at all perimeter walls, parapets, scuppers and adjoining areas. Phase 2 of this project was completed in November 2011. Architectural Preservation Studio was recently retained to design and administer Phase 3.