French Cultural Services in New York

French Cultural Services in New York

New York, NY

The Embassy of France retained Architectural Preservation Studio to inspect and develop construction documents and provide construction administration services for the French Cultural Center building located in the former Payne Whitney mansion. Designed and executed in 1906 by the architectural firm McKim, Mead and White, this beautiful building was purchased by the Government of France in 1954. It currently serves as a center for French Culture in New York City.

A comprehensive report was developed to demonstrate the restoration and conservation goals for the exterior façade and five public spaces on the first and second floors. The resulting work involved sensitively inserting new mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems into the first and second floors. The conservation program of public spaces on the first floor included the reattachment and paint restoration of the pastigla ceiling and the poulticing of the marble walls and floors.

French Cultural Services in New York

French Cultural Services in New York

New York, NY

The Embassy of France retained Architectural Preservation Studio to inspect and develop construction documents and provide construction administration services for the French Cultural Center building located in the former Payne Whitney mansion. Designed and executed in 1906 by the architectural firm McKim, Mead and White, this beautiful building was purchased by the Government of France in 1954. It currently serves as a center for French Culture in New York City.

A comprehensive report was developed to demonstrate the restoration and conservation goals for the exterior façade and five public spaces on the first and second floors. The resulting work involved sensitively inserting new mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems into the first and second floors. The conservation program of public spaces on the first floor included the reattachment and paint restoration of the pastigla ceiling and the poulticing of the marble walls and floors.

South Street Seaport - Schermerhorm Row Block

South Street Seaport - Schermerhorm Row Block

New York, NY

rchitectural Preservation Studio’s Preservation Group was responsible for the design and supervision of two phases of work at the South Street Seaport Museum and the Schermerhorn Row blocks for the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) through Turner Construction. The NYC-designated individual landmarks date to 1811-49. The first phase involved roof repairs and the installation of a snow-fence system for the slate roofs. The second phase included the restoration and rehabilitation of over 800 wood windows and doors. Typical repairs to the windows and doors included epoxy consolidation and dutchmen repairs.

National Archives at New York City

National Archives at New York City

New York, NY

Kip's Castle

Kip's Castle

Verona, NJ

Architectural Preservation Studio, under WASA, undertook a detailed conditions assessment and preservation master plan for Kip’s Castle Park for Essex County Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs. Constructed in the early 1900s and originally known as Kypsburg, the 10.5-acre park, located in Verona, NJ, includes the Castle and Carriage House. Kip’s Castle was listed in 2009 on the NJ State Register of Historic Places and is considered eligible for the National Register. In addition, in 1985, the site was designated a National Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society for Civil Engineers, because of the site’s association in 1816-17 with the US Coastal Survey (precursor to the National Geodetic Survey).

The intent of the project was to develop a preservation master plan for the site and buildings to serve as a template for long-term preservation. The project also recommended appropriate uses and programming utilizing a consensus-based process that engaged the key stakeholders and balanced location, legal requirements, community needs, Parks-system priorities and historic significance. Architectural Preservation Studio designed the unexecuted restoration of the interior of Kip’s Castle.

 

Governors Island

Governors Island

New York, NY

Under WASA, the professional staff of Architectural Preservation Studio was retained by Turner Construction and the Governors Island Preservation and Education Corporation (GIEPAC) to undertake repairs at seven of the historic structures located in the Federal- and New York City-designated historic district. The scope included repairs to the existing slate and sheet-metal roofs, as well as the wood windows and cornices. After a detailed hands-on inspection of Buildings 12, 108, 111, 112, 114, 125, and 409 by an articulating man-lift, it was determined that only selective repairs were required, which we designed and administered.

 

Rutherford World War One Monument

Rutherford World War One Monument

Rutherford, NJ

Designed and implemented by one of Rutherford’s prominent citizens, architect Edgar Irving Williams, the 30-foot Neo-Classical column is located at the intersection of Park, Chestnut, and Passaic Avenues in Rutherford, NJ. Dedicated on May 31, 1920, the Soldiers’ & Sailors’ Monument is a tribute to the men of Rutherford who sacrificed their lives during World War I. Architectural Preservation Studio was retained as a sub-consultant to the Borough Engineer to prepare a comprehensive evaluation followed by a restoration/conservation plan for this World War I monument. Through on-site observations, historical research and laboratory testing, we verified existing conditions and pathology of deterioration within the historic monument. Our goal was to provide a strategy for a holistic intervention that complies with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards, as well as in-keeping with the artist’s original intent. Architectural Preservation Studio also prepared the successful National Register nomination for the property.

The cast-stone memorial column is adorned with statuary bronze, including two tablets at the monument’s base. Atop the base are six eagles with interlinking garlands. Crowning the shaft is a bronze tripod completed with a glass light fixture resembling a torch flame. Additional lighting fixtures were once installed behind each eagle; however, none of these fixtures remain today. Architectural Preservation Studio refurbished the existing lighting fixtures, including the torch flame and the recessed fixtures in the base at the eagles. In addition, Architectural Preservation Studio designed the street-side lighting.

The cast stone is friable, displaying delaminations and vertical cracking, with some areas having complete loss of material. There is atmospheric staining, copper staining, biological growth, and calcium-carbonate deposits. Laser cleaning is being used to clean the bronze and cast stone. In addition, the light fixtures are being repaired and re-lamped. Restoration of paving and drainage system is also occurring. Architectural Preservation Studio assisted with the preservation of items in the time capsule stored in the base of the monument as well. Partial funding for the restoration work was provided by the Bergen County Historic Preservation Trust Fund.
 

 

Fountain of Time

Fountain of Time

Chicago, IL

The Fountain of Time was designed by J. J. Earley in 1922. Earley was a pioneer in the design of modern exposed aggregate concrete mixes. His water extraction technique demonstrated Duff Abrams’ 1918 water/cement-ratio law, unveiling “an exciting new artistic material.” 

Architectural Preservation Studio provided a peer review of work recommended by other engineers. An analysis was completed of the original construction system, aging process, deterioration pathology, and repair methods utilized to date.  All conservation, studies and contract documents for The Fountain were also reviewed. 

Concrete surfaces have eroded, exposing the aggregate and making it vulnerable far beyond the approximately 10% surface exposure envisioned by Early. A a twelve-point program was recommended, leading to crack stabilization, rigid and non-rigid repair of voids and mismatched patches, cement-paste surface renewal and water-repellent coatings.

Hinchliffe Stadium

Hinchliffe Stadium

Paterson, NJ

Working for the City of Paterson, NJ, Architectural Preservation Studio is undertaking the rehabilitation and renovation of the historic Hinchliffe Stadium and Athletic Field. Opened in 1932, the stadium is listed on the national, state and municipal Register of Historic Places, and in 2013, became recognized as a National Historic Landmark (NHL). Hinchliffe served as the home of the New York Black Yankees from 1933 to 1936, and is one of the few surviving Negro League baseball stadiums in the United States. Due to sinking and destabilization of the field and an advanced state of disrepair of the stadium itself, the facility has been unused since 1997.

Services at Hinchliffe Stadium included rigorous data collection leading to a report regarding the conditions of the concrete superstructure, bearing soils, environmental contaminants and archaeological sensitivity. In addition, Architectural Preservation Studio designed the restoration and rehabilitation of the stadium and athletic field. Site conditions were stabilized and secured through the removal of debris and vegetation, as well as the installation and/or repair of fencing in order to inhibit future vulnerability to human and environmental threats. Laser-scanning was used to produce highly-accurate documentation of the structure, as well as measured drawings. Construction documents were developed for the restoration of the building’s exterior walls and one segment of the stadium’s northwest corner, consisting of a portion of the grandstand, public sidewalk, and four ticket booths with terra-cotta and wrought-iron details.

Phase II involves the complete restoration of the remainder of the property, including the support spaces below the bleachers. The requirements for installing a regulation-sized track necessitated the design of a cantilevered portion to extend the field in order to accommodate this. A new building consisting of a Hall of Fame and high-end restaurant is also being designed.

 

Hinchliffe Stadium

Hinchliffe Stadium

Paterson, NJ

Working for the City of Paterson, NJ, Architectural Preservation Studio is undertaking the rehabilitation and renovation of the historic Hinchliffe Stadium and Athletic Field. Opened in 1932, the stadium is listed on the national, state and municipal Register of Historic Places, and in 2013, became recognized as a National Historic Landmark (NHL). Hinchliffe served as the home of the New York Black Yankees from 1933 to 1936, and is one of the few surviving Negro League baseball stadiums in the United States. Due to sinking and destabilization of the field and an advanced state of disrepair of the stadium itself, the facility has been unused since 1997.

Services at Hinchliffe Stadium included rigorous data collection leading to a report regarding the conditions of the concrete superstructure, bearing soils, environmental contaminants and archaeological sensitivity. In addition, Architectural Preservation Studio designed the restoration and rehabilitation of the stadium and athletic field. Site conditions were stabilized and secured through the removal of debris and vegetation, as well as the installation and/or repair of fencing in order to inhibit future vulnerability to human and environmental threats. Laser-scanning was used to produce highly-accurate documentation of the structure, as well as measured drawings. Construction documents were developed for the restoration of the building’s exterior walls and one segment of the stadium’s northwest corner, consisting of a portion of the grandstand, public sidewalk, and four ticket booths with terra-cotta and wrought-iron details.

Phase II involves the complete restoration of the remainder of the property, including the support spaces below the bleachers. The requirements for installing a regulation-sized track necessitated the design of a cantilevered portion to extend the field in order to accommodate this. A new building consisting of a Hall of Fame and high-end restaurant is also being designed.

Hinchliffe Stadium

Hinchliffe Stadium

Paterson, NJ

Working for the City of Paterson, NJ, Architectural Preservation Studio is undertaking the rehabilitation and renovation of the historic Hinchliffe Stadium and Athletic Field. Opened in 1932, the stadium is listed on the national, state and municipal Register of Historic Places, and in 2013, became recognized as a National Historic Landmark (NHL). Hinchliffe served as the home of the New York Black Yankees from 1933 to 1936, and is one of the few surviving Negro League baseball stadiums in the United States. Due to sinking and destabilization of the field and an advanced state of disrepair of the stadium itself, the facility has been unused since 1997.

Services at Hinchliffe Stadium included rigorous data collection leading to a report regarding the conditions of the concrete superstructure, bearing soils, environmental contaminants and archaeological sensitivity. In addition, Architectural Preservation Studio designed the restoration and rehabilitation of the stadium and athletic field. Site conditions were stabilized and secured through the removal of debris and vegetation, as well as the installation and/or repair of fencing in order to inhibit future vulnerability to human and environmental threats. Laser-scanning was used to produce highly-accurate documentation of the structure, as well as measured drawings. Construction documents were developed for the restoration of the building’s exterior walls and one segment of the stadium’s northwest corner, consisting of a portion of the grandstand, public sidewalk, and four ticket booths with terra-cotta and wrought-iron details.

Phase II involves the complete restoration of the remainder of the property, including the support spaces below the bleachers. The requirements for installing a regulation-sized track necessitated the design of a cantilevered portion to extend the field in order to accommodate this. A new building consisting of a Hall of Fame and high-end restaurant is also being designed.

Ansonia Nature Center

Ansonia Nature Center

Ansonia, CT

The Ansonia Nature Center was designed by architect Jonathan L. Foote in 1976. From its inception, the structure was designed to embrace its location on a sloping hill within a varied landscape. Constructed with locally gathered fieldstone and wood-framed end walls, each of its eight segments were themed to reflect its surrounding environment, as well as prevailing concerns of naturalists at the time.

Architectural Preservation Studio was retained by the City of Ansonia, Connecticut for professional services associated with the preparation of an Architectural/Engineering Building Condition Assessment and Capital Improvement Plan for the 1970’s main building at the Ansonia Nature Center.  The scope of work included: accessibility, interior finishes, exterior envelope (roof, windows and siding), electrical, mechanical, fire protection, security, technology, and plumbing systems, etc., the accessible route to the parking area and conditions within twenty-five feet of the building.

APS was recently retained again by the City of Ansonia for the preparation of construction documents and construction administration services for the design of a code compliant supplemental hand railing system to be added to the existing wood hand rails at the interior of the Ansonia Nature Center.

Old Saybrook Lighthouse

Old Saybrook Lighthouse

Old Saybrook, CT

Architectural Preservation Studio, PC (APS) was retained by Mr. Frank Sciame to perform historic research and a detailed up-close visual review and conditions assessment of the existing exterior envelope of the Old Saybrook Lighthouse in Old Saybrook, CT which he purchased from the US Coast Guard. 

ased on our site visit and an up close review of the existing conditions at the lighthouse we recommend a scope of work to be performed at the exterior of the lighthouse to restore the lighthouse to its original historic and water-tight, weather-resistant condition. Although we also reviewed the existing conditions at the interior of the lighthouse we did not included them in the report as that will be part of the interior fit-out project.

 Gilbert & Bennett Wire Mill

Gilbert & Bennett Wire Mill

Redding, CT

The professional staff of Architectural Preservation Studio, under WASA, worked with the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation to perform an architectural feasibility and concept-design study to adapt six existing historic industrial buildings/structures at the former Gilbert & Bennett Wire Mill in Redding, CT to a new program of uses. These buildings are the historic core of a 55-acre property listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and are contributing elements in the Georgetown Historic District. The purpose of the study is to advance the 2012 community-visioning initiative, an alternative program led by Re-Wire, to a feasible concept design in compliance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties that will attract local investment.

The study evaluated the potential capacity of the existing historic structures to be adaptively reused for various uses, based on their size, layout, and condition. The study provided order-of-magnitude costs associated with historic rehabilitation of buildings to meet the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Historic Rehabilitation. It identified critical issues that would need to be addressed as part of rehabilitation, or would be considered in decisions to remove or partially remove existing structures, or provide for reuse that would not attain the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards.

New Canaan Nature Center

New Canaan Nature Center

New Canaan, CT

Architectural Preservation Studio, PC (APS) was retained by The Town of New Canaan to prepare a comprehensive assessment of the current federal Title III Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility compliance issues for buildings designed for pre-school children at both the Education and Annex Buildings at the New Canaan Nature Center (NCNC).  Both buildings were built in the early 1900’s and were renovated in the 1960’s and 1990’s for pre-school functions.  The primary focus of this study was to provide the Town of New Canaan with a comprehensive illustrated assessment of the existing conditions at the Education and Annex Buildings.  Based upon the assessment we presented both recommendations and cost estimates for necessary modifications to make both buildings ADA compliant by performing “reasonable modifications” as defined by the ADA act.

Central Market

Central Market

Honk Kong

Architectural Preservation Studio is working with AGC Design Ltd. to rehabilitate and adaptively reuse the Central Market of Hong Kong the Urban Renewal Authority (URA). The 1938 Bauhaus-style four-story concrete structure covers a full block in the central business district of Hong Kong and is currently listed by the Antiquities Monuments Office (AMO) as a Grade IIl building. Central Market’s design emphasizes its horizontality with projecting brise soleils, visors and canopies, and concrete surfaces interrupted by steel hopper strip windows. The Central Market opened in a purposefully built Neoclassical structure in the area of the Canton Bazaar in 1850, which was later replaced with the current building.

The interior circulation is built around a central courtyard. Two main staircases exist at either end of the long north-south axis; these gain light from a courtyard. There is a one-bay wide two-story bridge at the center of the courtyard that links the west and east wings of the building at the 2nd and 3rd floors. The stalls on each floor are laid out on both sides of central aisles parallel to the long direction of the building. At its completion, the ground floor could accommodate 57 fish and 46 poultry stalls, the 2nd floor vegetable and fruit vendors, and 62 pork and 42 beef stalls were on the 3rd floor. The top floor includes roof terraces both towards the courtyard and street sides, along with rooms designed as offices for the Sanitary Departments. The building was closed to the public in 2003.

APS is working as the concrete conservators for the project for the exterior façade elements, as well as the preservation, display and interpretation of six original market-stall types, two of which have to be reconstructed. One portion of the building already functions as a walkthrough connecting the Central District’s skywalk system. The remainder of the building will be reused as an urban “oasis”, with prepared-food stalls and shops on three of the four floors and a garden in the central courtyard. The top floor will be used for utilities.